Archive for the 14 Years Old Category

Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson

Posted in 14 Years Old, 15 Years Old, Book Reviews, Coming of Age, Fiction, Uncategorized, Young Adult books on July 6, 2016 by Mr. Winch

spoiler alert!

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Laurie Halse Anderson´s 1999 Speak is a fiction novel set in current Syracuse, New York. Protagonist Melinda Sordino is a round and dynamic character who learns that with time she can accept what happened to her. In August, before Melinda´s first year of high school, Melinda calls the police when she is at a party. When Melinda´s friends and peers discover she broke up the party and got people arrested, she gets deserted and bullied. Over the course of the school year, Melinda´s past unfolds. When Melinda reveals her rape to her ex-best friend Rachel, her attacker comes to rape her again. Andy, the rapist, is caught by the lacrosse team and the story of Melinda´s rape is spread throughout the school. The traumatic events that Melinda experienced caused her to change dramatically. Her change and the conflicts/traumas she experiences help develop the main theme illustrated in the novel, which…

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Night

Posted in 12 Years Old, 13 Years Old, 14 Years Old, 15 Years Old, 1940s, Autobiography, Book Reviews, Coming of Age, Uncategorized on February 29, 2016 by Mr. Winch

 

Book Summary by Ashlin Shaw

Night by Elie Wiesel is an autobiography first published in 1960 and set in Europe in 1941-1945. The region is revealed on page 1: “that little town in Transylvania” and is clearly from 1941 because on page 1 it reads, “toward the end of 1941.” The protagonist is narrator and author Elie Wiesel, and he’s likely ages 12-15 because on page 1 (1941) it says, “I was twelve,” and the story ends in 1945.  An example of a flat and static character is Tzipora. Tzipora is a flat and static character because we don’t know much about her. All we know is on page 2 that she was “the baby of the family.”  She doesn’t change because this is as much as we find out about her in the novel. An example of a round and static character is Elie’s father. On page 2 it reads, ‘My father was a cultured, rather unsentimental man. There was never any display of emotion, even at home.  He was more concerned with others than with his own family.” We find out that Elie’s father doesn’t show any emotion for anyone including his family. His father was more concerned with others rather than his own family. His father changes and is concerned and protective of Elie when they both get sent off to multiple concentration camps. Elie’s father didn’t want Elie to share his food with him when he was sick because he wanted his son to survive. One major conflict in his story are surviving multiple concentration camps. By looking at this conflict and the way the dynamic character changes, a theme of this book is revealed: Don’t give up hope even when things seem like they’ll never get better. There are always brighter days ahead.

 

 

Stuck in Neutral by Terry Trueman (Summary by Tori Loveland)

Posted in 14 Years Old, Book Reviews, Coming of Age, Disabilities, Young Adult books on May 14, 2015 by Mr. Winch

  

Stuck in Neutral by Terry Trueman tells about the hidden life of a fourteen-year-old boy named Shawn McDaniel. Shawn has cerebral palsy and is unable to talk–or move, for that matter–on his own accord. We are introduced to your average character in a way that we rarely see. As you read, you hear Shawn’s thoughts as if he were right next to you, whispering in your ear. His family was told by doctors that he has a mental age of three or four and many people use baby-talk with him, though he is intelligent and claims to remember everything that he has ever heard. His father, Sydney McDaniel, is a writer who won a Pulitzer Prize for a poem that he wrote about Shawn. His father thinks that Shawn is in pain, and wants to relieve it. Shawn has reason to believe that his father is going to kill him.